LFAC news

  • Liberia – Tackling Type One

    05 October 2017

    ”If it wasn’t for Life for a Child the story of type 1 diabetes in Liberia would only be expressed as mortality rate. Management of diabetes at the individual level is beyond challenging due to pervasive poverty resulting in food scarcity and the inability to purchase insulin” Augustine, our man on the ground in Liberia.

  • Health System Reform

    04 September 2017

    IDF Life for a Child (LFAC) has commenced new work towards sustainability in diabetes care.

    For LFAC, two key pillars of sustainability include promoting health systems reform and encouraging advocacy.

  • View from The States

    04 September 2017

    James Ron, one of our great advocates in the USA recently wrote about his son’s diagnosis and why he supports the program:

    ‘’When our two-year old son, Sacha, was first diagnosed my wife, Emma and I scrambled to figure out how to get him the help he needed - long and short-acting insulin, syringes, test strips, Glucagon, HbA1Cs, etc. etc. - we wondered, "how do parents in poor countries cope?"

  • ''We didn’t know how we would be able to afford supplies''

    22 August 2017

    ''I live in Chimaltenango in Guatemala and I am 16 years old. Eight years ago I started to lose weight, I was very thirsty and urinated very often.

  • Annual Report 2016.

    11 July 2017

    During 2016 Life for a Child supported 18,653 young people living with type 1 in 42 countries. Check out the highlights here. 

  • Camping with Life for a Child

    10 July 2017

    Conducting a camp or activity day can be very daunting for diabetes centers in less-resourced countries so we encourage all the centers we support to start small, think about doing a 2 hour support group and build from there. We give comprehensive guidance and support for the first activity, and offer a manual and ad-hoc advice for subsequent activities.

    Just as in more economically resourced countries; the impact camp has on young people, cannot be underestimated, as this young boy in Nigeria says:

  • Type 1 in Sri Lanka

    14 June 2017

    It was a sticky, humid day in Colombo, Sri Lanka when I met Kassun. I was visiting the Sri Lankan Diabetes Association to meet young people supported by the program and the health professionals caring for them. The association had arranged for me to see the kids with the biggest challenges, none with HbA1c below 11.5%.

  • Spare a Rose 2017

    07 June 2017

    Thank you to the Diabetes Online Community! Over $22,000 was raised by Spare a Rose during 2017, enabling Life for a Child to support 369 young people with the insulin, tools and education they need to manage their diabetes.

  • Keeping Insulin Cool

    03 May 2017

    Imagine not having a refrigerator to store insulin! In some countries, evaporative cooling using clay pots are an alternative to a refrigerator. No one really knew how efficient these alternatives were so Life for a Child conducted a study to find out. 

  • Spotlight on Bolivia

    23 February 2017

    The latest update of the IDF Life for a Child (LFAC) Programme is now available, including information on LFAC's work in Bolivia, Pakistan and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

    The featured story is from Bolivia, where Katie Souris, a post-graduate student from the USA, recently visited the LFAC supported center in the country to look at the challenges facing young people with diabetes, and investigate the possibilities of peer support. 

    Download

     

  • Alone on the Island.

    28 July 2016

    Darlenis is the only young person living with T1D on San Cristobal Island, in the Galapagos Archipelago, so has very little support regarding her diabetes management. Darlenis contacted our colleague, Aracely Basurto, from FUVIDA diabetes center in Ecuador, seeking advice.

  • GUIDELINES FOR CONDUCTING DIABETES CAMP ACTIVITIES IN A LESS-RESOURCED COUNTRY

    16 May 2016

    DSC 1127 crop The IDF Life for a Child (LFAC) Programme encourages the diabetes centres in countries it supports to conduct camps or activity days for children and young people with diabetes.

    To this end LFAC, in collaboration with the Diabetes Education and Camping Association (DECA), has developed Guidelines for conducting diabetes camp activities in a less-resourced country.

    "Camp" is a term that includes not only overnight stays, but also activity days, support meetings, and get-togethers for children, adolescents and young adults with diabetes and their families.

  • SPARE A ROSE SAVE A CHILD THIS VALENTINE'S DAY!

    29 January 2016

    This Valentine’s Day, the Spare a Rose Save a Child campaign will once again raise awareness and donations for the IDF Life for a Child Programme by encouraging people to buy one less rose and donate the value of that flower to children with diabetes. 

  • FORMAL EVALUATION OF IDF LIFE FOR A CHILD PROGRAMME COMPLETED

    28 October 2015

    In 2014, the International Diabetes Federation Life for a Child (LFAC) Programmes's largest donor - The Leona M and Harry B Helmsley Charitable Trust - commissioned the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to conduct a comprehensive formal evaluation of the work of LFAC.

    The work was conducted by a team lead by Professor Martin McKee and Dr. Sue Atkinson. Site visits were done in five countries: Rwanda, India, Jamaica, Mexico, and Philippines.

  • MAJOR CONTRIBUTOR COMMITS 780,000 ADDITIONAL VIALS OF INSULIN TO LIFE FOR A CHILD

    16 June 2015

    Eli Lilly and Company, a major contributor to the IDF Life for a Child Programme (LFAC), recently announced an additional commitment of 780,000 vials of insulin to LFAC.

    Lilly’s new commitment builds on the company’s previous donation of 800,000 vials of insulin over the past six years, which reached more than 14,000 children in approximately 34 countries. Over the next three years, Lilly will donate approximately 260,000 vials of insulin each year to Life for a Child. This commitment will allow LFAC to continue providing treatment for children in the countries where the programme currently operates and to increase the amount of insulin supplied for distribution.

    "Lilly's donation of insulin offers continued hope to children and families in need who are trying to manage type 1 diabetes in very challenging conditions," said Dr Graham Ogle, LFAC General Manager.

    Read the press release.

  • SPARE A ROSE 2015: ROSES SPARED CHILDREN SAVED

    03 March 2015

    This Valentine’s Day, the Spare a Rose Save a Child campaign was once again a resounding success with over USD 24,000 raised for the IDF Life for a Child Programme (LFAC). Thanks to the 684 donations received, more than 400 children with diabetes in the developing world will be kept alive for one year.

  • NEW COUNTRIES JOIN LIFE FOR A CHILD PROGRAMME

    27 November 2014

    As the end of 2014 nears, it is exciting to reflect that the IDF Life for a Child (LFAC) Programme has not only expanded support to six new countries but also increased the number of centres in countries already participating in the programme. Some 15,000 children and youth in 48 developing countries and the health professionals who care for them, are currently receiving a variety of resources free of charge from LFAC.

  • IDF PARTNER CONTINUES ITS SUPPORT FOR LFAC

    19 November 2014

    Boehringer Ingelheim, a partner of the International Diabetes Federation, continued its support for the International Diabetes Federation's Life for a Child (LFAC) Programme by organising a fundraising event in the lead up to World Diabetes Day (WDD) - 14 November. This is the sixth year they have supported this programme.

  • TACKLING THE NEW YORK CITY MARATHON FOR LIFE FOR A CHILD

    07 November 2014

    If you follow the IDF Life for a Child Programme on Facebook, you may already have read and been inspired by Veerle Vanhuyse. Veerle contacted LFAC in August, while training for the 2014 TCS New York City marathon, wanting to raise money for the Programme. A dedicated runner, Veerle was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 16, and 27 years on intimately understands the challenges diabetes can present on a daily basis.

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